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Mental health unit opening takes NEA out of the Dark Ages

Finally gone are the days when folks experiencing a mental health breakdown in public get thrown into the county jail, charged with being drunk, insane or disorderly and forced to stay there until they can pay off their fine. That's the definition of insanity,. . .

Trump won -- again

Watching the Democratic presidential debate Thursday night left one clear impression: Donald Trump won. Please don't shoot the messenger. My left index finger recoiled a bit as it reached for the "T" on the keyboard. But it's true for this reason: Democrats. . .

After Bolton, Trump's goals remain unrealized

The sudden and bitter departure of John Bolton from the White House was baked in the cake from the day he arrived there. For Bolton's worldview, formed and fixed in a Cold War that ended in 1991, was irreconcilable with the policies Donald Trump promised in his. . .

Perrin gets into firestorm, but booze equals revenues

When Mayor Harold Perrin cast the deciding vote on Sept. 3 that gave city council approval for the Malco Hollywood Cinema to receive private club status, and thus sell alcohol, he set in motion a flood of anger. The Arkansas Alcoholic Beverage Control Divisi. . .

Government-run health care

"When would you like to schedule your knee replacement surgery?" asked my American doctor before I left for Ireland? I gave him a date that works for me (I'm calling it the result of an old basketball injury, not advancing age). His office scheduled it for that. . .

Dunford was a steady hand during Trump-era turmoil

Gen. Joseph Dunford, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff who will retire this month, is that rare senior official in Donald Trump's Washington whose career and reputation don't seem to have been tarnished by his dealings with the president. The. . .

Any person of any race can be a racist

The scientific definition of race is nonexistent. It is arbitrary. With the emergence of curiosity about our ancestry, many people have joined internet searches and genealogy businesses such as Ancestry.com to determine their "supposed racial and ethnic" roots.. . .

Why one ex-con is 'proud of the man that I have become'

Less than a year ago, Terrance Knowlton was in a Wrightsville prison for dealing drugs. Now, he says, "I'm proud of the man that I have become today." How did he get from there to here? Partly thanks to Shorter College. Knowlton, 30, made bad choices in life and. . .

Book offers prison stories, elicits ministry memories

A slim volume, titled "Overdue: A Dewey Decimal System of Grace," arrived in my mailbox a few weeks back. Sister Mary John Seyler had it sent to me, knowing I had attempted to help her with her prison ministry (unsuccessfully, so far) and perhaps as a gentle. . .