JONESBORO — Former Arkansas State relief pitcher Tyler Zuber, who has spent the last three seasons in the Kansas City Royals Minor League system, has made the Opening Day roster for the Major League club.

Zuber had an impressive a summer camp for the Royals, when he pitched to a respectable 1.17 ERA over 7.2 innings, registering nine strikeouts. He only allowed three hits and a walk and held opposing batters to a .130 average.

Should he appear in a game, he’d be the first former A-State player to play in big leagues since Daniel Wright in 2017 season for Angels.

“We are extremely excited for Tyler making his MLB debut with the Royals,” said A-State head baseball coach Tommy Raffo. “It has been a crazy unprecedented year for professional baseball, but Tyler kept his focus, trained hard to be the best he could be, and now the opportunity has presented itself.

“Focus, hard work and perseverance pays off. The Red Wolves baseball family is very proud of this moment in his career and we look forward to following many more.”

The White Hall native was selected by the Royals in the sixth round of the 2017 MLB June Amateur Draft with the 180th pick. Zuber has played across four different levels since being selected by Kansas City.

In three seasons in the minor leagues, Zuber had an 8-10 record with 45 saves and a 2.96 ERA with 177 strikeouts in 133.2 innings pitched.

Zuber enjoyed an impressive senior season for the Red Wolves with a 2.06 ERA in 52.1 innings pitched, along with a 6-1 record and six saves to lead the team in both categories. The 2.06 ERA ranks as the fourth-best in school history, and he improved to 20-9 in his career with the 20 wins ranking as third-most all-time at A-State, while he notched 12 career saves for the second-most in school history.

Additionally, the right-handed reliever led the team with 80 strikeouts against just 16 walks. He allowed 29 hits and held opposing batters to a .162 average, also the best mark on the team.

He was second on the team in appearances with 25 to give him 89 for his career, which is third-most in school history. The 80 punch-outs also gave him 258 for his career to place him second in school history.